The Water Shed

The Water Shed was founded by Environmental Technologist Stephen A. Burke in 1980.

Celebrating 40 Years, bringing Nova Scotians Clean water

Consecutivley winning the Consumer Choice Award for 9 Years

The Water Shed is the only place in the Atlantic region that offers this unique mix of products and services. Nobody else in Atlantic Canada combines all this under one roof..

We’re Nova Scotia’s largest water testing and treatment company.

As one of our longstanding services, we offer water testing. In addition, we have a water analysis service to assist and reassure home sellers & buyers during real estate transactions

Well Drilling and Well Services

When it comes to well drilling, well assessments and well services, we are at the ready to help whether you need a brand new well, your well needs a repair, your pump needs to be replaced, or your existing well isn’t producing enough water and needs a boost.

Come Visit Our Show Room

The Water Shed carries a wide range of top quality water softeners, water treatment systems, well pumps, and other products..

I have no water. Why does the pressure gauge on my pump or pressure tank say zero?

There are a number of possible reasons for your situation. Here are just a few steps you can take to save yourself time and perhaps some money too.

  1. If you have experienced a recent power outage, your “low level cut-off switch” may have shut your pump off. Look at the pressure switch (usually a grey or black box located near the pressure gauge) and follow the instructions on the side of the box closest the reset lever. No luck?
  2. Make sure the breaker or fuses used to operate your pump are not blown and that you have power to your pump. To find the breaker or fuses, follow the wiring from the pressure switch. Turn off the pump’s power supply and check the breaker or fuses. Got power, but still no water?
  3. Check to see if you have water in your well. This could mean having to remove the crock lid on a dug well and taking a look or it could mean removing the well cap from a drilled well and either taking a look or using a “dip string” with a weight on the end. Deep drilled wells are often difficult to sight because the static water level may be 50 feet or more below ground level. Got water, but still no luck?
  4. You may have a pump problem. If you have a jet pump installed somewhere near your pressure tank, check to see if it is overheating, humming but not turning, leaking, or has a burning electrical smell. If you have a deep submersible pump it is advisable to call a professional.

Is it time for a new pressure tank?

Do you know when you need a new one?

Your well pump forces water to the surface. Without a pressure tank, the well pump would need to turn on every time you opened a faucet in order to maintain water pressure. Your well tank acts as a water storage container giving your well pump a much needed rest in between cycles. When air pressure inside the well tank decreases due to water usage, a pressure switch automatically activates telling the well pump to fill the tank. This assures an ample supply of well water will be on hand the next time you need it.

Troubleshooting guide
If it appears that a bladder tank is not operating correctly, check the tank’s air charge:

  • Disconnect electrical power to the pump.
  • Drain the tank by opening the closest faucet.
  • Check the tank’s pressure by placing an air pressure gauge on the air charging valve on the top of the tank.
  • Add air if the pressure is more than 2 psi below the pump cut-in pressure. Use caution when using an air compressor or air pump.
  • Release air if the pressure is 2 psi above the pump cut-in pressure (lowest pressure in the operating range).
  • Check for leaks in the air charging system by dripping a soap solution on the air charging valve.
  • Re-start the pump and run through a normal cycle to verify the setting. If tank pressure drops abnormally, the bladder inside the tank may have a tear or hole in it.

Is it waterlogged?
You should also check a bladder tank to determine if it’s waterlogged. A tank is waterlogged if it is completely filled with water or has too much water to function correctly. Waterlogged bladder pressure tanks contribute to the following problems:

  • The pump motor cycles too often. Frequent cycling can shorten the lifespan of a pump.
  • Because waterlogged tanks can contain stagnant water, there can be unsatisfactory coliform samples or taste and odor complaints.
  • Premature tank failure: The inside walls of a waterlogged tank can corrode and weaken from the exposure to water.

It may often be most cost-efficient for the customer to simply replace a waterlogged tank.

Reasons for waterlogging
Bladder tanks can become waterlogged for many reasons. Some of the more common reasons are:

  • Sediment, such as iron and manganese, can coat the surface of the bladder, causing it to harden and become less flexible.
  • Sediments can plug the fill or draw line, preventing the tank from filling and emptying normally.
  • Excessive levels of chorine can damage the bladder, causing it to become brittle and less flexible.
  • Tanks sitting directly on the ground or on another surface that is continually moist can rust and lose structural integrity.
  • Chlorinators can give off corrosive vapors that cause the tank to rust.

When working with bladder pressure tanks, always be sure to read and follow the manufacturer’s safety warnings.

Have any questions? Contact us at The Water Shed at 1 (800) 667-5566.

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